Tag Archives: Turnaround

Business Restructuring! Do You Know When it is Time?

When do you know it is time for a business restructuring? Wait too long..it may be too late!

Restructuring TimeA restructuring, is it time? Tick, tick, tick, the clock is ticking. In less than a week payroll is due. The company does not have enough cash to pay the 200 employees and you are not even thinking about how to pay the suppliers. The credit line is fully drawn and you have no more collateral to give. What do you do? How much time does the company have? These are the type of issues the company is facing. Is it time for a business restructuring?

If you cannot meet payroll, staff will leave, the state will be notified that the employees have not been paid, and this will be only the beginning of the company’s problems.  You know that if the company does not meet payroll, the game, known as the business, is over. And this is the only the start of the problem. For a privately owned business, personally guaranteed company obligations will default, and the personal assets of the owners will be seized.

This is not so much of an extreme case. This scenario often happens. So thinking about the company from the perspective of how to avoid or change the situation is critical.  A business restructuring may be needed and now!

Business difficulties can happen quickly and for many reasons. Businesses may suffer from lost market expectations, reduced operating earnings, or severe cash flow troubles. Whether triggered by marketplace forces or internal dynamics, an early assessment and quick decisive moves will be needed to reinvigorate earnings and company value (PriceWaterhouseCoopers LLP, 2012). This is when you know that a business restructuring must commence.

Stakeholders Want Answers

Collectively, employees, vendors, bankers, and other creditors (the stakeholders), will be assessing answers from the rubble of the company to questions ranging (DiNapoli & Fuhr, 1999) from “What’s in it for me? to “What are my alternatives?” to “How did this happen and when do I get my money?” Think about it; the following questions each stakeholder will want to know:

  • The causes of the company’s distress
  • Required steps to affect an effective restructuring
  • Management’s capabilities, abilities and costs to execute a restructuring plan
  • Assessing alternatives to the restructuring and the related costs
  • Determining the goals of the various stakeholders
  • Establishing the value that can be realized from company for a restructuring, a sale or liquidation of the business

Many issues can cause business distress. Liquidity constraints can limit the business from operating efficiently. Cash flows, cash reserves and access to a working capital line of credit can result in a short-term liquidity crunch. The inability to pay employees, suppliers, and the taxing authorities can be acute. This will lead the company to failure.  A business restructuring will be required.

Economic Downturn

An economic downturn, shifting buyer taste or behavior, increased competition, ineffective operations, disruptive technologies, incompatible strategies, issues that can seriously place the company into financial distress. Left unanswered can result in threatening the organization’s existence.   A host of problems will trigger declines in revenue, customer loss, key employees, profitability, and cash flows that will lead to working capital constraints. Distressed symptoms often occur well before crisis hits and is felt. Before you know it, the company is in a death spiral. This situation is not inevitable, and in many cases, can be halted and reversed. Taking aggressive action and discovering at an early stage through reviewing the organization’ strategies and it operations efficiencies can lead to a swift, decisive action to restore organizational performance and enterprise value.  Timely action is critical in making this happen.

When a company is doing poorly that failure appears imminent, only a restructuring or turnaround can restore performance and profitability that can enhance the value of the business.

The best way to learn how to restructure a business is to study failure.  Think about it, NASA studied its mistakes to make corrections with the space shuttle program. Pharmaceutical companies and financial services companies study product design failures to make improvements, and hospitals study their service offerings to improve the quality of healthcare service. Successful companies create value for shareholders, customers, and other constituents.

Many companies that once dominated their markets later slide into corporate distress often occur. These organizations lose their touch. It is often said that success breeds failure. Companies no longer have that “mojo” that touch, which creates shareholder value. When a company succeeds, we assume that they know what they are doing, but in fact it could be they got lucky. Companies create an overconfidence bias, becoming so self-assured that they think they do not need to change anything.

Business Restructuring

A number of factors influence a business restructuring strategy to achieve recovery. From an external perspective, in most part, the competitive environment and the maturing of the industry influence the selection and effectiveness of the turnaround strategies. From an internal perspective, the severity of the financial distress and management failure is a contributing factor to formulating the turnaround recovery strategy. The choice of the restructuring strategy is a function of the company size, management perception of the external factors, but most importantly, the degree of resource availability.

For a small business, given the exceptional high mortality rate, elements of decline and failure are important. Small business failure is generally attributable to issues of management control. Performance deterioration and resource availability are critical factors of for the enterprise success in addition to the strategies chosen to, in some cases, stop the bleeding.

Two organizations that have members that can effectively structuring and implement a business restructuring strategy include the Association of Insolvency and Restructuring Advisors (AIRA) where you can find a Certified Restructuring and Insolvency Advisor (CIRA) and the Turnaround Management Association (TMA) where you can look for a Certified Turnaround Professional (CTP).  Remember…tick, tick, tick the clock is ticking maybe to your business’s decline.

References:

DiNapoli, D., & Fuhr, E. (1999). Trouble Spotting: Assessing the Likelihood of a Turnaround. In D. DiNapoli, Workouts and Turnarounds II: Global Restructuring Strategies for the Next Century: Insights from the Leading Authorities in the Field (Vol. I). John Wiley and Sons.

PriceWaterhouseCoopers LLP. (2012, August 20). Restructuring and recovery. Retrieved August 20, 2012, from PWC: http://www.pwc.com/us/en/transaction-services/restructuring-recovery.jhtml#

 

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The Entrepreneurial Distressed Business: Assessing the Business Failure Signs

The Entrepreneurial-Based Business

The competitive dominance of entrepreneurial driven companies have historically forged the path of economic growth. Now at the time when such dominance is needed with a vengeance for prosperity and employment,  such owners are working hard to stay afloat and survive especially after the recent financial meltdown and the great recession.  The fundamental issue is that tools and the conceptual frameworks that work for traditional businesses must be modified to meet the challenges, operations, and new business models of today’s entrepreneurial-based companies.

When dealing with an entrepreneurial-based business, when the company is in trouble, recognizing this fact will give the owner more options for dealing with the problem to save the business. However, by waiting too long, being in a state of denial, not taking decisive action will leave the entrepreneur with little options other than shutting down the business or bankruptcy. Furthermore, the longer the owner waits, the likelihood that the owner’s personal finances will be affected, in the event that the owner’s are personally liable for the business debts. This can leave the entrepreneur filing for personal bankruptcy protection.

Signs of Distress

Every business is different. So the signs that the business is in trouble may not be the same for one company compared to another. However, certain warning signals are clear. The business may be in trouble if:

  • Revenue has been trending down for the past several quarters and below the budget.
  • Demand for the products or services have dropped off.
  • Loss of one of more important customers and being unable to find replacements
  • Finding it harder to fund working capital needs as cash becomes tighter and tighter.
  • Struggling to fund payroll
  • Being unable to service the debt or even meeting just the interest
  • The company’s debts being turnover to collection agencies
  • Creditors asking for more cash collateral
  • The bank is unwilling to extend additional credit or threatening to call the loan.
  • Using collected payroll tax money to fund operations instead of sending it to the government. [A major no…no!]
  • Key managers and staff have begun to quit

Bad to Worse

With symptoms like the above, conditions can transform from bad to worse. For example

  • The IRS is beginning action to levy company bank accounts and following other avenues to enforce collections
  • Suppliers and creditors threatening to sue to collect owed moneys
  • Secured creditors liquidating collateral
  • Eviction notices received covering rented facilities
  • Key suppliers requiring cash, no credit

Entrepreneurial Options

Options that may be to the entrepreneur include:

  • Selling of the business in entirety
  • Liquidating the business through bankruptcy
  • Selling off parts of the business
  • Saving the business through restructuring or a bankruptcy reorganization

When the business is heading towards the “zone of insolvency,” the entrepreneur needs to first decide whether or not to stay in business. This is an important decision. Deciding on whether to cut off a cancerous limb to stop the infections or to treat it must be made.

Decision Factors

For an entrepreneur, emotions and egos must be set aside. Issues to be considered must include the welfare of the family and self.  Moreover, reflections must be made questioning:

  • The ability to raise fresh capital, and
  • The capacity to obtain the capabilities needed to turn around the business, which is like changing the direction of a battleship whether it is a small, medium size business or large corporation. Can enough momentum be directed toward business renewal?

Not all distressed businesses can be saved. Knowing if the company can be salvaged and which ones have little or no chance of survival is important.  The sooner that decision is made; the sooner steps can be taken to either begin the process of business turnaround or winding down the company.

Turnaround Basic Questions

Basic questions or requirements that are needed for a successful turnaround must have four characteristics:

(1)  Does one or more viable core businesses exist within the enterprise?

(2)  Can adequate bridge financing be obtained?

(3)  Does the company have sufficient organizational resources and skills

(4)  Can the company secured a turnaround manager (leader) to facilitate the daunting restructuring task?

Professional Advice

Having poured their hearts and souls in to the business, the entrepreneur must try to be objective about the prospects for the future. Although emotional attachment is there, they should seek professional advice from other entrepreneurs, lawyers, and accountants for recommendations of turnaround professionals. As a start, the membership of the Turnaround Management Association comprises of specialist (Certified Turnaround Professionals) in the area of business turnarounds.

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For a  free online accounting mini course “Cracking the Accounting Code” designed for entrepreneurs go to http://AccountingMiniCourse.com

 

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What is a Corporate Restructuring or Turnaround?

First, there is no hard rule or definition as to what constitutes a corporate turnaround or a corporate restructuring. The generic term is a company or firm or business unit that exhibits financial performance that in the foreseeable future, unless short-term corrective action is not taken, may fail. Let us say:

  • Corporate restructuring is a tactic used in an attempt to correct a declining financial situation or climbing out of insolvency.

A corporate restructuring or turnaround may be simply defined as a company’s existence is threatened as it moves from economic performance to decline or zone of insolvency. The decline or bankruptcy may take several years, however when extreme events take place, a shorter time frame may put the enterprise into peril.

In some circumstances the term may mean a financial restructuring by reorganizing and/or cleaning up the balance sheet using financing methods that changes the capital structure of the organization.

Surprisingly, a turnaround can be a situation where a company may exist without having a cash crisis. When measuring a company’s performance, as measured by return on capital employed, the turnaround candidate can be an organization that is performing below what is expected for a business in which it is engaged.  It is about recognizing that a company often displays symptoms of failure prior to any crisis beginning. It could be businesses with underutilized assets and poor management. Many companies have survived or stagnated for years in spite of ineffective management. If such stagnation does not change, the crisis situation will succeed because management has not taken the necessary steps to turn the situation.

Crisis situations are often in stable and mature industries and sometime with competitive advantages. Such companies are also firms that are closely held or family controlled. To avoid placing the enterprise in a crisis, it is about early instituting turnaround and restructuring strategies to avoid company trauma. Too often even a growth-oriented company that has grown too fast and is very profitable may experience a severe cash crisis. Alternatively, a company can report a loss in one year does not constitute a turnaround issue. Such a loss may be expected in executing a competitive strategy. However, a loss in one operating unit may place the whole company into a death spiral.

A company can become insolvent if management takes no corrective actions. Even external events may postpone the inevitability on insolvency, but it will not avert it. The outcome of management’s corrective action either will be successful or unsuccessful in which case the insolvency will lead the company into bankruptcy.

Generally, a corporation’s life cycle can be looked at as a humped curve of four stages. From (stage-1) start-up the company grows to a point of (stage-2) maturity then begins to (stage-3) decline until it reaches (stage-4) the zone of insolvency“. Not all businesses follow such life-cycle curve, since organizations can be reborn or transformed anytime. Some companies, in fact, institute competitive strategies that change the shape of the curve to an S-Curve to progression. The corporate turnarounds logically addresses two issues:

  • The measurement of a turnaround performance, and
  • The characterization of a turnaround cycle, which is the decline phase followed by a recovery phase.

Defining turnarounds on the basis of profitability (return of assets or return on investment) alone is problematic. The accrual quality of the turnaround company’s accounting may be low and result in manipulated earnings management. Companies gradually lose competitiveness, but this is often not reflected in deterioration in profitability. Rather, earnings flat line then plummet or the time lag between competitiveness and earnings improvement exist. With management’s “window dressing” a lag in indices showing a distressed state, the signals of impending trouble can be masked.

Simply put, the framework of the turnaround is to avoid the company moving into the “zone of insolvency” and then ultimately into bankruptcy. Taking proactive strategies to control the business is the objective.

Related Posts:

Corporate Strategies—Avoiding the Flawed Strategy

Strategy: Good Strategy or Bad Strategy? 5 Lessons to Follow

 

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